Journal


Sewing, Needlework and Embroidery Blog. Creating textile art and design that has an impact on society. Helping to build financial independence to women who love to create products from textile by sewing, embroidery and needlework. 

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Doubt your doubts and believe your beliefs.

"I believe…" But do we really "believe"? or is it just lip service or wishful thinking. There is a BIG difference.

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Definition of "Believe" - to have confidence in the truth, the existence, or the reliability of something, although without absolute proof that one is right in doing so.

Believing starts in the mind. It's a seed. You water it with thought patterns. Whether its achieving a goal or changing a circumstance the more you feed your mind with the right thoughts your life will blossom in that direction. Hence I thought it was appropriate to illustrate a bright colorful flower in a hip bohemian way.

Free spirited, fun — BELIEVABLE!

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Sewing Up An Innovative Campaign

Taken from Step by Step Graphics Magazine - May/June 1990 by Simon N. Dumenco

Kathy Lengyel uses decidely non-traditional tools – brightly colored fabric and a sewing machine – to stitch together a three-part advertising campaign for a Georgia mill.

You've got a problem. You're doing a new ad campaign for a fabric manufacturer, Thomaston Mills, that needs to reach clothing designers who read the trade magazines. But you can't depict clothing because you've tried that in the past and that made people think that Thomaston makes clothing (it only makes fabric).

The Thread of an Idea - Artist Kathy Lengyel used the advertiser's actual product, fabric, to stitch together a three-part advertising campaign for Thomaston Mills.

The Thread of an Idea - Artist Kathy Lengyel used the advertiser's actual product, fabric, to stitch together a three-part advertising campaign for Thomaston Mills.

So what do you show in the ad? Bales of fabric? Too prosaic. The factory? That wouldn't appeal to designers. Artfully arrayed swatches of fabric? Sorry, it's been done.

How about the fabric as art? In other words, the client's product actually used as the components of an illustration?

Concepting The Campaign

"The timing was great," says art director Jane Kelley who is with the Atlanta advertising agency Earle Palmer Brown. Commercial art rep Dick Crooks had recently visited Kelley's office and showed her some pretty unusual stuff – fabric illustration done by a Florida artist named Kathy Lengyel, recent winner of three merit awards at the 1989 Dimensional Illustrators Adwards Show. Serendipitously, Kelley then got involved in redoing the Thomaston campaign.

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"The timing was great," says art director Jane Kelley who is with the Atlanta advertising agency Earle Palmer Brown. Commercial art rep Dick Crooks had recently visited Kelley's office and showed her some pretty unusual stuff – fabric illustration done by a Florida artist named Kathy Lengyel, recent winner of three merit awards at the 1989 Dimensional Illustrators Adwards Show. Serendipitously, Kelley then got involved in redoing the Thomaston campaign.

"We were interested in replacing a single two-thirds-page ad (run exclusively in the Daily News Record, an apparel industry trade magazine) that we had done last year with a rotating small space campaign," says Kelley. "We thought that this would increase awareness and the breadth of our message." But the client wanted her agency to key into "innovation" as a theme, and Kelley and her colleagues were having a hard time thinking up something truly innovative.

Then it struck her: "The artwork in the ad could be made from the client's product. "The entire ad would be their product, not just a portion of it," Kelley thought. Her mind raced back to the fabric illustrations Crooks had shown her. "I immediately knew then that Kathy would be perfect for the job."

Kelley contacted Lengyel. Then, in conjunction with Earle Palmer Brown account exec Libby Whelan and the marketing people at Thomaston, who loved the idea, Kelley began conceiving of a subject matter for the illustrations.

"We were looking for an approach that would show the fabrics as being bright, colorful, innovative, flexible," Kelley says of their thought process. "I equated it to selling paints to artists - we were selling fabric as a tool for the designer. So what we decided to do was show them, 'look how much fun we've had with the fabric; just think of what you could do with it."

Earle Palmer Brown copywriter Joe Parris broke the "innovation" theme into three factors particular to Thomaston Mills' relationships with its customers—flexibility, quick response and partnership. These would serve as the basis for a series of three separate illustrations. Each image would be used in a separate pod of the rotating campaign.

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Earle Palmer Brown copywriter Joe Parris broke the "innovation" theme into three factors particular to Thomaston Mills' relationships with its customers—flexibility, quick response and partnership. These would serve as the basis for a series of three separate illustrations. Each image would be used in a separate pod of the rotating campaign.

Parris wrote a short block of copy for the "partnership" pod that begins: "At Thomaston, we never forget that our success depends upon yours. And we consider ourselves your innovative partner." Kelley saw this idea being represented visually by an object that demands partnership—a tandem bicycle.

For "quick response" Kelley came up with a machine-age icon: a jet plane. The copy describes Thomaston as providing "superior service that is immediate, correct and thoughtful."

And for "flexibility," Kelley devised a witty treatment—a two-driver "tandem car" of the sort seen in circuses and parades. Here the copy reads, "We are rigidly bound to one thing only—satisfying your needs."

Kelley wanted all of the images to be "very contemporary and graphic," so the art director came up with tight marker comps for the types of illustrations she wanted. (See Figure 1)

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Planning The Illustrations

(Figure 1)

"I sent Kathy as many different colors and textures of fabric as I could get my hands on form the client," says Kelley. (See figure 2) Usually, Lengyel selects fabrics from her own considerable inventory; but in this case, of course, she had to use Thomaston fabrics exclusively. Then Lengyel was on her own.

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(Figure 2) For starters, she rescaled the tandem bicycle illustration slightly, working from a reference photo to ensure accurate proportions. (For the purposes of this article, we will bypass the other two illustrations in the campaign and follow Lengyel's progress on the bicycle.) Then she ran into her first problem: She had to scramble for buttons for the bicycle wheels.

Though the final print size of the ads would be 6 x 7 -inches, Lengyel worked in a blown up scale, 13 x 15 -inches. She does this every time she sews a picture so that it is easier to stitch even the minutest details of the illustration. That meant she had to find two-inch buttons—and purple ones (her chosen color) at that. Fortunately, a local piece good store was able to fill this unlikely order. (See Figure 3)

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(Figure 3) Before Lengyel proceeds with an illustration, she usually does a line drawing and tapes small swatches of different colored fabrics exactly where she intends to sew them into place in her final piece. But because she was working with a tight deadline, she did not even have time to express Kelley such a detailed comp. Instead, she faxed her a copy of just the line drawing and Kelley gave her the go-ahead.

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Assembling The Illustration

(Figure 4) There is much more than meets the eye in one of Lengyel's fabric illustrations. On the back of the light-colored fabric (in this case, the inner wheels of the bicycle), she irons an interfacing, a papery white fabric that comes in a fuseable (self-adhering) form. (See Figure 4) "That gives it more solid backing and prevents fraying," she explains. It also prevents the darker colors underneath from showing through. Lengyel also intended for these illustrations to have a quilted, three-dimensional feel, so she placed a cotton batting beneath the background fabric. Finally, beneath the batting she placed a muslin fabric to hold everything together and to provide an even more solid field on which to sew. The relatively stiff muslin fabric prevents the background fabric from bunching under the sewing machine needle. (See Figure 5)

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Now came the tough part: cutting out the tiny bits of fabric that make up the illustration. Using a light box, Lengyel traced the lines from her drawing directly onto fabric with special markers (Fade Away Fabric Markers, White Sewing Products, Cleveland, Ohio) that feature disappearing ink. (See Figure 6)

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Unfortunately, tracing on a light box works with light colored, semi-transparent fabrics. For the tires of the bicycles (for which she selected a black denim to convey the color and texture of rubber), she cut apart her line drawing and used the cut-out tires as templates to cut out the denim. (See Figure 7)

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Once Lengyel has all her colors and shapes cut out, she employs another trade secret that would not be obvious to the casual observer of her finished piece—she spray mounts fabric pieces into place. (See Figure 8) Then she sews a loose basting stitch across the piece to keep the backing layers (the batting and the muslin) from bunching up while sewing. (See Figure 9)

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Surprisingly, Lengyel does not use straightedges or curved templates to guide the needle of her trusty Bernina sewing machine. She also rarely uses all the fancy stitch options it offers. About the only control she employs is the knob that varies the width of the zigzag stitch. Lengyel's steady had is her franchise; it is what gives the professional, graphic art edge to what has previously been deemed a folk art or a craft. (See Figure 10)

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Like a kid who eats all her vegetables first, then all her mashed potatoes, then all her meat, Lengyel always sews assembly-line style. "I go with all the greens, all the blues, and all of the reds." And for good reason: She must change her thread color, and re-thread her machine, with each fabric color change. When she is done, Lengyel is always quick to trim the odd, loose thread right down to the base, keeping the art clean.

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Finishing Touches - The buttons and the bicycle chain—a clever design grace note which is actually a string of miniature decorative beads—went on last. But before Lengyel sewed them into place, she stretched and stapled her artwork onto a wooden frame. (See Figure 11 and 12) "But I always leave the edges loose loose in case I have to make changes." Lengyel can make changes if they are relatively minor (such as substituting a different colored fabric in a certain place). But for the bicycle illustration, and the plane and car illustrations as well, Jane Kelley required no changes. The piece was completed in just about a week, from start to finish.

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Creating The Mechanicals

Lengyel's art was shipped back to Atlanta, where Kelley finalized her mechanicals. For the headline of the bicycle ad, the art director dropped in the "Partnership" in Kabel Bold, which she selected for its strength as a headline face. "I also wanted to choose a sans serif face to continue the really graphic, contemporary look of the illustrations" Kabel fit the bill.

For the body copy, Kelley selected Quorum Medium, which she characterizes as "a contemporary face with some character." Quorum Medium is technically a serif face, but as Kelley notes, the serifs are rather minimal. As such, it serves to bridge the gap between the overal modern style of the ad and the classical feel of the Thomaston logo, which appears at the lower right corner of the body copy.

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Photographing The Art

One last thing Lengyel is very particular about: who gets to photograph her work. There is one person in the world she trusts with her art: a man she pridefully calls a "German master photographer," Hans Kaczmarek. Lengyel and Kaczmarek are practically a package deal these days. Until she found him, every photographer she worked with tended to underexpose or overexpose transparencies of her work. Kaczmarek, who says, "I've been in photography for 50 years, since I've been a kid," knows how to fix a shadow, how to filter for color balance, and most importantly, how to throw the right amount of light on the subject. Trade secrets, all of these. "I won't go into detail," he deadpans. "The Kentucy colonel doesn't give his recipe to everybody and neither do I."

The Response

Kelley loved the finished work and so did the rest of the folks at Earle Palmer Brown. "Everybody in this office has come and asked me if they could have the finished art when the ads were finished being produced."

However, Thomaston Fabrics had first claim. Thomaston exec Dan O'Keefe says, "We're going to frame them and put them up, that's how much we think of them."

O'Keefe is also rather pleased with the product image positioning Lengyel's illustrations provided. The look of the campaign, he says, "is very homey and very much in tune with what's being reflected in the apparel business itself right now."

Just in the stitch of time, so to speak.

A Feeling For Fabric

She'd rather you not blab this all over the place, but Kathy Lengyel's got a little secret about her fabric illustration: "It really doesn't take that long."

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She'd rather you not blab this all over the place, but Kathy Lengyel's got a little secret about her fabric illustration: "It really doesn't take that long."

That's great for Lengyel, because like all commercial illustrators, she routinely faces brutal deadlines. "Really, selecting and cutting out the fabric"—translating the picture into three dimensions—"takes longer than sewing it."

Lengyel has been sewing prolifically since childhood. A native of Bridgewater, N.J. Lengyel learned the basics from her mother. She also took a Singer sewing mini-course that was all the rage in the 70's. And she has been sewing pictures since college. Lengyel had done a fabric illustration on a whim for a college design competition at Hood College, where she studied, and she scored first place. "Then I just kind of put it aside and went into the graphics field."

But stuck in the back of her mind were the words and art director she met at a career day in college: "This is it, the AD said when he saw her fabric illustration. "Forget all the other stuff you do. You're just one in a million there, but this is different." At the time, Lengyel just thought, "Yeah, but how can I make a living doing this?"

Instead of pursuing illustrations as a career, she headed into graphic design and art direction, working a succession of jobs in advertising and publishing all in the Tampa Bay area. Then at one point she did a few more fabric illustrations, showed them to a rep who liked them, and the spark was rekindled.

In 1987, while still working, she started Kathy Lengyel Design out of her home, still her base of operations and where she has completed fabric illustrations for recent clients which include Publix supermarkets, a Florida hospital, and YKK Zippers. Most of her billing is for traditional graphic design work—brochures, logos, and retail ads for local market real estate and health care—for which she has racked up 11 local Addy Awards.

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Applique and embroidery – Digitizing a design on a backpack.

The process of taking my art and converting it to stitches requires the use of digitizing software. Every line and shape is built in layers like creating a painting. Certain elements of the art are placed first. Then the next color is built on top of that and so on. So if you were to start to digitize this piece the first thing placed on the fabric is the blue applique. Then the applique of the top heart and face of the girl. To give you an idea of the number of layers stitched in this piece – there are 46 color changes and 50,812 stitches in this 8 x 11 inch embroidery piece. The photograph above shows the first stitch out on white felt.

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The process of taking my art and converting it to stitches requires the use of digitizing software. Every line and shape is built in layers like creating a painting. Certain elements of the art are placed first. Then the next color is built on top of that and so on. So if you were to start to digitize this piece the first thing placed on the fabric is the blue applique. Then the applique of the top heart and face of the girl. To give you an idea of the number of layers stitched in this piece – there are 46 color changes and 50,812 stitches in this 8 x 11 inch embroidery piece. The photograph above shows the first stitch out on white felt.

This one is very close with just some minor adjustments to color and density. I feel confident that these changes will work. On to the final embroidery sew out and construction of the bag.

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This one is very close with just some minor adjustments to color and density. I feel confident that these changes will work. On to the final embroidery sew out and construction of the bag.

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Create a movement to end modern day slavery.

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I know I am just one person and my vision of a world without slavery can not be done by me alone. Sometimes I just feel so overwhelmed by all the problems in this world. But if I can make just a dent in stopping modern day slavery it will be worth it. Here is my design for our “Deliverance” bag. I purposely chose to convey a blonde female of light color skin because if my interpretation is like most people, the majority believe human trafficking is happening mostly to the women in third world countries. But I want people to realize it is happening to every races all over the world. The hands represent being “taken” while the butterfly and hearts symbolize love and freedom. I would love to hear your opinion and what the design means to you.

Applique and embroidery – Digitizing a design on a backpack.

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Stop Human Trafficking

When you hear the term human trafficking what do you think that means? My first opinion was the abduction of young people and forcing them into labor or sexual exploitation in third world countries. What I didn’t realize is this despicable criminal injustice is a massive global issue and growing in the United States.

A couple of months ago I watched the movie “Taken” and it opened my eyes to the undercover world of sex slaves. To think that this is actually going on is unspeakable and yet it is true. In Europe and America not just third world countries.

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A couple of months ago I watched the movie “Taken” and it opened my eyes to the undercover world of sex slaves. To think that this is actually going on is unspeakable and yet it is true. In Europe and America not just third world countries.

According to Polaris Project a non-profit organization to stop human slavery, human trafficking is modern day slavery and is the second largest criminal industry in the world. The Polaris Project website best describes defines human trafficking as “Victims of human trafficking are people forced or coerced into labor or sexual exploitation. Labor trafficking is widespread in variety of situations that encompass domestic servitude and small-scale labor operations, to large-scale operations such as farms, sweatshops, and major multinational corporations. Sex trafficking is one of the most lucrative sectors regarding the illegal trade in people, and involves any form of sexual exploitation in prostitution, pornography, bride trafficking, and the commercial sexual abuse of children. Under international law, any sexually exploited child is considered a trafficking victim, even if no force or coercion is present.

An estimated 17,500 foreign nationals are trafficked annually in the United States alone. The number of US citizens trafficked within the country is even higher. An estimated 200,000 American children are at high risk for trafficking into the sex industry each year.”

Here are the types of Human Trafficking in the US according to the National Human Trafficking Resource Center (NHTRC)

Labor Trafficking:

  • Domestic Servitude/Domestic Worker Cases
    • Nannies
    • Maids/Housekeepers
  • Small Businesses/”Mom and Pop” Operations
    • Landscaping
    • Nail salons
    • Restaurants
    • Industrial cleaning
    • Construction
    • Hospitality
  • Peddling Rings/Sales Crews
    • Magazine sales crews
    • Flowers/Candy sales crews
  • Large-Scale Labor Cases
    • Agricultural
    • Factory settings (i.e. garments; food processing)
    • Other large factory work environments (i.e. industrial welding)

Sex Trafficking:

  • “Hostess” Bar/Club Operations with Inflated-Price Schemes
    • These cases may be classified as labor trafficking if commercial sex acts do not occur. However, these operations often involve some linkage with commercial sex acts.
    • Eastern European/Russian stripping or exotic dancing “Go-Go Clubs”
    • Latino cantina bars
    • Asian room salons, hostess clubs, and other karaoke clubs
    • Domestic strip clubs and gentleman’s clubs
  • Residential/Underground Brothel Settings
    • Residential brothels can be based in homes, apartments, hotel/motel rooms, trailer parks, mobile trailers, and other outdoor locations.
    • Residential brothels are diverse and can include both foreign born and US citizen populations.
  • Escort Services (Both Incall and Outcall)
    • Bar/Hotel-based
    • Internet-based
    • Private parties (house, club, lap dance clubs)
    • Boat cruises
    • Phone chat lines
  • Pimp-Controlled Prostitution
    • Hotel-based
    • Internet/Escort-based
    • Private parties
    • Street-based
    • Truck stops
    • Other miscellaneous locations

Other:

  • International Marriage Brokers/Servile marriage
  • Personal sexual servitude

I feel strong need to help this cause. My next handbag design will be called “Deliverance” and will go towards stopping “Human Trafficking”. There’s alot of information about warning signs and what to look out for. I really just mentioned what it is here. To learn more about Human Trafficking check out these websites.

Polaris Project

National Human Trafficking Resource Center

Florida Coalition Against Human Trafficking

The A21 Campaign

Stop Child Trafficking Now

LA Dream Center

Feel free to add if you know of others.

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Artistic snippets of fabric and thread transformed into pictures.

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Painting, sewing, arts and crafts have always been a favorite pastime of mine growing up in Bridgewater, New Jersey. As a young child, I enjoyed making gifts for family members and they cherished my handmade creations. I always tried to create something that would have a special meaning to them. For example, in high school I painted a picture of my grandparent’s beautiful home for them. The painting hung over their fireplace for years and became quite a conversation piece (the proud grandparents they were). Now my mom has the painting as a keepsake of my art and my grandparent’s home. I created a portrait of my grandmother holding my son which was made from fabric sewn together. This was given to my grandmother for her 80th birthday. That picture will someday be passed down to my son. These are just two examples of many gifts I enjoyed creating to touch people’s lives.

After my son was born in 1992 I started my own design studio. After several years of building a portfolio of fabric art in the commercial art world, family and friends suggested I create patterns for the quilting industry. In 1996, a new dimension was added my art. I started a small pattern publishing company called “Artistic Appliqué”. Artistic Appliqué published several intermediate to advance applique patterns and a book called “Celebration of Summer”. In 1999 and 2000 I taught classes at Husquvarna Viking annual dealer’s conventions on appliqué and embroidery. My different machine appliqué technique has inspired many quilters to a new approach to quilting. From this, Cactus Punch licensed some of my designs by digitizing them for the home embroidery sewing machines.

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What do I call it? Fabric art, fabric illustrations, fabric collage art?

I have always had a love for textile and art; in college I would experiment with combining fabric, paint and thread to make pictures. My junior year I entered a contest for Mademoiselle magazine where the winner receives a summer internship with Conde Nast in New York City. I created a perpetual calendar using fabric prints that matched the season for the background and felt letters with Velcro for easy removal. The calendar would flip open with rings. I received $100 and was in the top 10 of all entries.

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 During my senior year I entered another competition called “The Real Show” sponsored by the Art Director’s Club of Washington D.C. The contest required students to submit solutions to “real” projects in the working world. I designed a cover for the Washington Post Magazine showing boys fishing at summer camp. The piece was created using fabric and paint with hand stitched outlines. It received first prize in its category. I was beginning to think this was what I am gifted to do but I couldn’t see how I could earn I living doing it. I wasn’t  aware of anyone using that technique in the commercial art world. At that time, even quilts were considered something placed on beds not displayed as wall art. So after graduation I did what most graduates hope to do, I got a job in my area of study – visual communications.

In 1981, I started as a graphic artist for a furniture chain creating advertising layouts, store displays, and black and white line art drawings of furniture. Then moved into publishing for a tourist guide. My career was moving in the right direction when I became an art director for an advertising agency. While working there I saw a directory for illustrators called “The Creative Black Book” which featured the nations top illustrators. I came across an illustrator who worked with fabric as her medium. I thought to myself “There it is! Someone doing what I love to do!” So I did my research, found out most of these illustrators had artist representatives so I looked for one in the Tampa Bay Area. I contacted Alexander Pollard to show them my portfolio. Their biggest concern was how the art would photograph, since it would be the photograph of the art used for production. They agreed to represent me if the art photographed well. On to the next hurdle, finding a photographer who is great at taking pictures of textile art. Working for an advertising agency was a benefit for finding great photographers – Hans Kaczmarek, a German master photographer. Hans did a beautiful job photographing my art and Alexander Pollard agreed to represent me.

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Computer art didn’t enter the market until the late 80′s so most commercial illustrations consist of traditional mediums of paint, ink, pastels, paper collage or pencil. Illustrations were either scanned or photographed. The majority of art directors understood the traditional mediums and felt comfortable directing the illustrator with a particular assignment. But they didn’t understand my technique or how I went about it. They thought it would take too long to meet the assignment deadline or would cost too much. We had to educate them to my commercial art background that my technique took no longer than any other medium and costs just slightly more (for photography). Once I got more assignments, art directors could see the many uses but it did take a while for it to catch on. In 1990, my art was featured in Step-by-Step Graphics (now Step Inside Design) magazine for an advertising campaign for Thomaston fabrics. During that time, I received several other assignments for illustrative work from clients like Ford Motors, Honda Motors, Georgia Pacific, Publix Supermarkets, Florida Power, and Bank of America (Nations Bank). My national breakthrough came from Berkley Publishing when they commissioned me to create 13 romance novel covers for their new “Romance in the Heart of America” series. The series become such a success for the publisher and spawned the careers of several authors that the series continued for several years with over 60 covers illustrated from 1990 – 1995. Several of the romance covers won merit awards from the Dimensional Awards Show, which selected the best in 3-D Advertising and Publishing Worldwide. During that time I was constantly struggling with what to call my technique – fabric art, fabric illustrations, fabric collage art? I was trying to take fiber art into the commercial art world of advertising and publishing where it was virtually non-existent.

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Kathy Lengyel receives Merit Award at CraftArt 2009

We are happy to announce Kathy Lengyel received a merit award at CraftArt 2009 in St. Petersburg, Florida Nov. 21, 2009. This prestigious fine craft juried show draws craftsmen from across the country with 132 artist represented.

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We are happy to announce Kathy Lengyel received a merit award at CraftArt 2009 in St. Petersburg, Florida Nov. 21, 2009. This prestigious fine craft juried show draws craftsmen from across the country with 132 artist represented.

The show juror was David Revere McFadden, Chief Curator and Vice President for Programs and Collections at the Museum of Arts & Design in New York City. He served as Curator of Decorative Arts and Assistant Director for Collections and Research at Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum, Smithsonian Institution from 1978 to 1995. For six years, he served as President of the International Council of Museums’ Decorative Arts and Design Committee. McFadden has organized more than 120 exhibitions on decorative arts, design, and craft, covering developments from the ancient world to the present day, has published more than 100 catalogues, essays, articles, and reviews, and has lectured extensively. McFadden has received the Presidential Design Award three times, is an Associate Member, The Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths, London; Knight First Class, Order of the Lion of Finland; Knight Commander, Order of the Northern Star of Sweden; and Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres of France.

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Significant Journey Gives 250 Handmade Little Purses, Destined To Bring Joy To Impoverished Nicaraguan Girls.

Significant Journey, Inc. is on a mission to put smiles on little girls’ faces this Christmas. The handcrafted small girl purses were specifically made to be a part of the 500 Christmas shoeboxes sponsored by Harborside Christian Church in Safety Harbor, FL.

Safety Harbor, Florida, July 15, 2009 – Significant Journey, Inc. an online designer handbag company donates its time and materials to make 250 small cotton purses for Harborside Christian Church’s “Loving & Helping Others”. It’s their Christmas in July ministry outreach of 500 Children Christmas Shoeboxes and 30,000 meals being shipped to Nicaragua. The shoeboxes contain toiletries and small toys along with the meals will be assembled July 25th at Harborside Christian Church by members and friends and then shipped to Nicaragua in September.

“I saw a need for small purses on the list of donated items for the children’s shoeboxes and decided we could make purses for them. We know a purse won’t change their living conditions, but as women we know the joy of owning a beautiful purse. It will help give the little girls a positive image of themselves”, says Kathy Lengyel, president of Significant Journey.

Tucked inside each purse is a pink card with a scripture written in Spanish that will give the girls hope. “The message is to remind them that God loves them and that He is there for them always”, says Peggy Smith, vice president of Significant Journey.

All of Significant Journey’s handbags are designed for the purpose of giving back to society. Kathy Lengyel is the designer who made Significant Journey bags transcend beyond a product used to carry a woman’s possessions into something with more significant meaning. “The goal of Significant Journey is to design an exceptional USA made embroidered bag that carries a symbolic message to the owner while benefiting other people in society”, says Kathy. Kathy looks at world issues or lifestyle when creating a new handbag design. She finds an encouraging word to name the style and then searches for a need (cause) that fulfills that style.

Significant Journey purses are available online at www.significantjourney.com. Each purse is made to order and takes 3-4 weeks.

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